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Buddhism and Modern Psychology に戻る

プリンストン大学(Princeton University) による Buddhism and Modern Psychology の受講者のレビューおよびフィードバック

4.8
5,492件の評価
1,888件のレビュー

コースについて

The Dalai Lama has said that Buddhism and science are deeply compatible and has encouraged Western scholars to critically examine both the meditative practice and Buddhist ideas about the human mind. A number of scientists and philosophers have taken up this challenge. There have been brain scans of meditators and philosophical examinations of Buddhist doctrines. There have even been discussions of Darwin and the Buddha: Do early Buddhist descriptions of the mind, and of the human condition, make particular sense in light of evolutionary psychology? This course will examine how Buddhism is faring under this scrutiny. Are neuroscientists starting to understand how meditation “works”? Would such an understanding validate meditation—or might physical explanations of meditation undermine the spiritual significance attributed to it? And how are some of the basic Buddhist claims about the human mind holding up? We’ll pay special attention to some highly counterintuitive doctrines: that the self doesn’t exist, and that much of perceived reality is in some sense illusory. Do these claims, radical as they sound, make a certain kind of sense in light of modern psychology? And what are the implications of all this for how we should live our lives? Can meditation make us not just happier, but better people? All the features of this course are available for free. It does not offer a certificate upon completion....

人気のレビュー

LW
2020年10月25日

I thought this was a great introduction to both modern Buddhist thought and evolutionary psychology. Professor Wright is an excellent lecturer, and his office hours are informative as well as amusing.

RB
2019年10月15日

This is a interesting overview about Buddhism comparing with insights of modern Psychology. Very well structured, interesting examples en easy to follow. Sometimes you have to reconcider your thought!

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Buddhism and Modern Psychology : 1601 - 1625 / 1,858 レビュー

by Sharathchandra L

2020年8月10日

good

by Aleena M P

2020年7月31日

GOod

by Anastasia R D

2020年7月26日

good

by Ruchita K

2020年6月16日

Good

by AMJITH S

2020年6月9日

Good

by KUMAR K 1

2020年6月1日

nice

by MEENASHREE S S

2020年6月1日

good

by Chandan R I

2020年5月29日

Best

by SHUBHAM A M

2020年5月29日

Best

by K S C

2020年5月17日

Good

by Sanjay J

2020年4月29日

Best

by BRIGETTA C

2020年4月26日

GOOD

by Akshay R

2017年6月13日

good

by Tomas B

2015年9月24日

A+++

by timir b

2020年6月11日

Yes

by 肖晓伟

2016年5月25日

很不错

by Leonardo R C

2017年10月6日

ex

by Lilyana S

2017年5月3日

in

by Ricardo V

2020年9月6日

R

by Katy P

2019年7月21日

I

by Prince A

2019年1月14日

s

by DILEEP K B

2017年6月26日

-

by Robert P

2016年6月16日

H

by Atzin G

2016年1月4日

Y

by Irina R

2018年1月9日

A complete novice in the topic, I really apreciated the course. It allowed me to emmerge into the subject of Buddhist philosophy; it also opened the door to the evolutionary psychology. I have an impression to get a lot out of the course. Especially in terms of "what to learn next". My curiosity is on its highest now ;) - I think it is the best a student can get.

A university lecturer myself, I appreciated the way Robert delivered his lectures. Very animated, well paced and supported by a good portion of "side discussions", interviews and references to the literature, the course was mostly seamless and easy to follow. The analytical approach that Robert practices in the course also speaks a lot to me: every concept is explained and put into the context, providing the logical links to the other concepts discussed.

The lecture on the week 6 was the hardest for me: it seems like my lack of background in the subject became critical by that time. Or, probably, following the course during a trail running is not the best approach :). Any way, compared to the previous lectures (for example, the modular mind concept was very well debated), the concepts of "Morality" and "Naturalistic Buddhism" seemed fuzzy to me.

For example, from the course, I cannot get clearly a definition of moral truth. What is "moral" according to the Buddhist teaching or according to the evolutionary theory any way? I seemed to miss the point on how the "ethics" comes to play. I also did not grasp: What are the characteristics of Naturalistic Buddhism? (any differences with secular Buddhism or other schools? Sure, one can learn it on wikipedia. But to ensure the seamless lecture flow, this could be a good introduciton). Bottom line: the topic requires probably more structured and profound analysis.

Besides all said, I tried to catch up with the support materials and was mostly interested by video interviews - the darwindharma web site is most helpful. Having not much time to sit in the forum, I appreciated a lot the Office hours as they provided a sort of digest of the students' feedback.

Now I have the "Moral Animal" sitting on my bedside table. Time to read :) If you read this review considering to take the course - DO IT!

------ Irina Rychkova,

Associate Professor in Information Science,

University Paris 1, Pantheon-Sorbonne, France.